40th Anniversary Retrospective: Angie Peatman

Our final contributor to the series is longtime Napa resident and community leader Angela Peatman.

1. How did you initially become involved with Cope Family Center?

A friend had been a volunteer and told me about Cope. I took a 10-week training course that was required before working with social service nonprofits in Napa, and I chose Cope as the agency I wanted to work with.

2. What gave you the greatest satisfaction when you were affiliated with Cope? 

Volunteering at the grassroots level – childcare during parenting classes, some front office time, accompanying home visitors, working on fundraising, major gift campaigns, and special events like the Blue Plate Special Celeb, waiters’ party, house parties, etc.

3. How have you seen Cope change over the last 40 years? 

Exponential growth and expanded services. There is a new sense of leadership in the entire Napa Valley nonprofit scene.  And I’ve seen quite a change in terms of innovative fundraising techniques.

4. Do you have any recommendations on other people we should speak with about Cope’s 40th anniversary?  

Stephanie Grohs and Lee Schwab Patti Brown.

5. Where do you see Cope Family Center going in the next 40 years?  

I expect Cope to continue to play the nonprofit leadership role that it has established in the community. It is among the most respected of the local nonprofits. It may need to consider a larger venue for the offices and to meet growing services. The present location is ideal for a large number of clients, but the house has special limitations.

40th Anniversary Retrospective: Ray Guadagni

Today’s featured supporter is Ray Guadagni, Judge, Napa Superior Court.

1. How did you initially become involved with Cope Family Center?

I first became involved when I became a board member in 1976 (Cope Family Center was started in 1972).

2. What gave you the greatest satisfaction when you were affiliated with Cope? 

The new programs and the ways that Cope expanded and the increase in families that were being served. It was very satisfying to see that Cope became the first family resource center in the county. Additionally, the satisfaction of being on the board and working collaboratively with other folks with the same mission.

3. How have you seen Cope change over the last 40 years? 

Certainly Cope has changed by growing. It has added more programs serving more families in different ways with different needs – adding more education programs for parents, more home visiting, and working with other agencies. Supervised visitation was a wonderful and necessary addition to Cope. And Kids’ Turn is a program that I completely love. I wish every parent would participate in Kids’ Turn whether or not their dissolution is amicable. Even people who are not going through divorce could benefit from this program – seeing how children communicate and what to watch for and how to talk to them and listen to them. We become parents without any real knowledge of how to parent or get children ready for school or proper discipline. Kids’ Turn could benefit all of us. Cope has become so well known and that is a difference I have observed over the years. When we first started Cope was not well known and it only had the 24-hour hotline – now the agency is one that everyone knows about. Cope is great.

4. Do you have any recommendations on other people we should speak with about Cope’s 40th anniversary?

Ardis Troedson, Judy Waggoner, and Linda Thomas Scott (founder); people on the child abuse prevention council and people from child welfare and public health; also, juvenile court – Commissioner Williams and Judge Diane Price.

5. Where do you see Cope Family Center going in the next 40 years?

In the next 40 years I see Cope continuing to expand services and helping more families. Those of you who serve on the Cope board and the Cope staff and its wonderful executive director, please know that you do make a profound and positive difference in peoples’ lives. Keep up the great work you do.

40th Anniversary Retrospective: Terrie Truchard Lilley

Today, we feature Terrie Truchard Lilley, former home visitation program manager.

1. How did you initially become involved with Cope Family Center?

I began working with Cope Family Center in November 1997.  I had completed graduate school in Houston and wanted to move to Napa to be near family. A family friend (Kristi Brandt from Napa Co. H&HS) recommended that I send a resume to Cope as my area of study and interest was Maternal and Child Health. Luckily for me, they actually had a position open for a Program Manager. I started in November of 1997 and worked to help start the Kids’ Turn program as well as coordinate the volunteer training and Child Abuse Prevention Program. I left Cope for a brief spell (2000-2001) but really missed working there and returned as a Program Manager, first as the Education Program Manager and then as Home Visitation Program Manager. I continued working for Cope until 2004 when my daughter was born.

2. What gave you the greatest satisfaction when you were affiliated with Cope?

When I was with Cope, I derived a great sense of satisfaction from working directly with the families and from the sense of community within the organization. It was very fulfilling to work with parents during their time of crisis and give them resources and hope. You become very involved with the families and feel like you have a stake in their success. I also really enjoyed the feeling of family within the Cope staff and I truly miss them to this day. If I did not live so far away, I have no doubt that I would still be involved with Cope in one way or another.

3. How have you seen Cope change over the last 40 years?

When I started at Cope, it was still known as C.O.P.E. (Child or Parent Emergency) and we occupied only the downstairs of the current office. Everyone on the staff wore many different hats during my first years there.  Though Cope was doing much of the same type of work all along, it was when we got the ABC grant in the ’98 or ’99 that things really seemed to change. Along with the physical remodel of the building, there was an expansion of the Home Visitation Program and we were able to reach a much wider audience.

4. Do you have any recommendations on other people we should speak with about Cope’s 40th anniversary?

I’m sure you have already contacted her, but Judi Hernandez would be a wonderful resource about Cope “back in the day.”

5. Where do you see Cope Family Center going in the next 40 years?

I have no doubt that Cope Family Center will soar over the next 40 years. I’m sure it will continue to strengthen relationships with it’s community partners and become even more ingrained in the fabric of Napa. As new needs arise, Cope will create programs and systems to address these issues as they have for the past 40 years.

40th Anniversary Retrospective: Jerry Hurley

Today, our featured volunteer, is Jerry Hurley.

1. How did you initially become involved with Cope Family Center?

I don’t honestly know when I first became involved with Cope. I believe it was quite some time ago, perhaps even when I was at Domaine Chandon (some 22 years ago ), and we were involved in some kind of fashion show. I do know that it was the first local charity I became aware of and it has stayed close to my heart for that reason and because of the extent of its’ influence. I am a big family person and believe that problems solved at the family level have much greater implications later.

2. What gave you the greatest satisfaction when you were affiliated with Cope?

Knowing that it was local serving, and seeing with my own eyes where and how my efforts were channeled into the foundations of the community in which I live.

 3. How have you seen Cope change over the last 40 years?

I’ve seen it grow to help support more diverse causes under the same umbrella.

4. Where do you see Cope Family Center going in the next 40 years?

Just keep it local, keep focused, and stay the course.